Film Friday- Cardcaptor Sakura

The series was adapted into a 70-episode anime television series by Madhouse that aired on Japan’s satellite television channel NHK BS2 from April 1998 to March 2000. Additional media produced include two anime films, as well as video games, art books, picture books, and film comics. An anime television series adaptation of Cardcaptor Sakura: Clear Card Edition has been announced for January 2018. Tokyopop initially released the manga in English in North America from March 2000 to August 2003. After Tokyopop’s license for Cardcaptor Sakura expired, Dark Horse Manga acquired the license and released the series in omnibus editions from October 2010 to September 2012.

Nelvana licensed the TV series and first film for North American broadcast and distribution, renaming it Cardcaptors, which first aired on Kids’ WB from June 2000 to December 2001. All 70 episodes were dubbed; while other English-speaking territories received the full run, the version aired on American television was heavily edited into 39 episodes. Cardcaptors also aired on Cartoon Network, Teletoon and Nickelodeon. The TV series and films were sub-licensed by Geneon, which released them unedited with English subtitles. The TV series was also later released by Madman Entertainment in Australia and New Zealand.

Critics praised the manga for its creativity and described it as a quintessential shōjo manga, as well as a critical work for manga in general. The manga series was awarded the Seiun Award for Best Manga in 2001. The anime television series was praised for transcending its target audience of young children and being enjoyable to older viewers. The artwork in the anime was also a focus of attention, described as above average for a late-1990s TV series, and Sakura’s magic-casting scenes were complimented for being nearly unique because of the regular costume changes. The anime television series won the Animage Grand Prix award for Best Anime in 1999. The American edit of Cardcaptors, however, was heavily panned by critics for cutting out character backgrounds essential to understanding the plot.

2018 series

An anime television series adaptation of the Cardcaptor Sakura: Clear Card Edition sequel manga has been announced for January 2018, with Asaka, Ohkawa and Madhouse returning from the original anime series to direct, write and produce the new adaptation, respectively. The main cast from the original anime also returns to reprise their roles.

Films

Madhouse produced two, 82-minute anime films as an extension to the anime television series series. The first, Cardcaptor Sakura: The Movie, was released on August 21, 1999. Set between the first and second seasons of the TV series, the film shows Sakura and her friends going to Hong Kong where they encounter a vengeful spirit who was hurt by Clow Reed in the past. It was released to VHS, LD and DVD in Japan by Bandai Visual in February 2000. Nelvana released an English dubbed version of the film, retaining the same name and story changes as its main Cardcaptors dub, although it was dubbed with no visual edits and was released in cut and uncut versions. As with the TV series, Pioneer Entertainment also released the film with the original Japanese audio and English subtitles, and also released a bilingual DVD containing both audio tracks. Both the edited and unedited versions were released on VHS and DVD in March 2002. Discotek Media released the first film on Blu-ray Disc and DVD on September 30, 2014 in North America.

The second film, Cardcaptor Sakura Movie 2: The Sealed Card, was released in Japan on July 15, 2000. It provided a conclusion to the TV series, in which Syaoran returns to Tokyo in hopes of getting Sakura’s answer to his love confession, but her own confession is interrupted by the appearance of a 53rd Clow Card. It was released to LD (as a limited edition) and DVD in January 2001, and to VHS in July 2001. It was released in North America to DVD by Pioneer in November 2003 and featured an English dub by Bang Zoom! Entertainment instead of Nelvana and Ocean Studios, now with Kari Wahlgren as Sakura, and this time retaining the original character names and the content unedited and uncut. The films as released by Pioneer (later renamed Geneon) remained in print in North America until late 2007. A bonus short film titled Leave it to Kero! was played with the theatrical screening of the second film.

Manga Monday- Cardcaptor Sakura

Cardcaptor Sakura, abbreviated as CCS and also known as Cardcaptors, is a Japanese shōjo manga series written and illustrated by the manga group Clamp. The manga was originally serialized in Nakayoshi from May 1996 to June 2000, and published in 12 tankōbon volumes by Kodansha from November 1996 to July 2000. The story focuses on Sakura Kinomoto, an elementary school student who discovers that she possesses magical powers after accidentally freeing a set of magical cards from the book they had been sealed in for years. She is then tasked with retrieving those cards in order to avoid an unknown catastrophe from befalling the world. A sequel by Clamp titled Cardcaptor Sakura: Clear Card Edition focusing on Sakura in junior high school began serialization in Nakayoshi with the July 2016 issue.

The Cardcaptor Sakura manga series was popular with Japanese readers, ranking among the top five sellers during its release. The manga series was awarded the Seiun Award for Best Manga in 2001. Shaenon Garrity of The Comics Journal described the series as a quintessential shōjo manga, which is praised for its mature direction in the second half. Cardcaptor Sakura has been described as a “critical work” of manga by Christopher Butcher of Comics212. In a review by Lisa Anderson of Manga Life, the subplots in the series related to the interactions between characters were noted to be of special interest. Anderson praised how the manga, while at the onset begins with a costumed Sakura chasing after a Clow Card, takes a “rather big leap in another direction” when focusing on the characters. The manga is further lauded for its depth. Anime News Network (ANN) reviewer Robert Nguyen felt Cardcaptor Sakura is an “atypical shōjo” manga, which puts an “emphasis on the emotions of the character.” The original manga sold over 12 million copies as of 2016, while the sequel series had surpassed 1 million printed copies as of April 2017.

In Manga: The Complete Guide, Mason Templar states that the series is not “just one of the best kids’ manga in translation, it’s one of the very best manga available in English, period.” He praises Clamp for their creativity and shrewd business sense, in being able to create a series that “clearly has merchandising in line” and an “utterly forgettable premise” into a story that is “brimming with warmth and joy and wonder” and is “much more than the sum of its parts.” The manga is cited as being cute by critics, and in some cases too cute; however, Anderson stated that “much like Magic Knight Rayearth, even a cute story will have its depth and drama.” The artwork of the manga is praised for being detailed and having “beautifully drawn pictures of the Clow Cards themselves.” The cards are described as having “an artful blend of magical fantasy and reality.”

Plot-

Cardcaptor Sakura takes place in the fictional Japanese city of Tomoeda which is somewhere near Tokyo. Ten-year-old Sakura Kinomoto accidentally releases a set of magical cards known as Clow Cards from a book in her basement created and named after the sorcerer Clow Reed. Each card has its own unique ability and can assume an alternate form when activated. The guardian of the cards, Cerberus, emerges from the book and chooses Sakura to retrieve the missing cards. As she finds each card, she battles its magical personification and defeats it by sealing it away. Cerberus acts as her guide, while her best friend and second cousin, Tomoyo Daidouji films her exploits and provides her with battle costumes. Sakura’s older brother Toya Kinomoto watches over her, while pretending that he is unaware of what is going on.

Syaoran Li, a boy Sakura’s age and descendant of Clow Reed, arrives from Hong Kong to recapture the cards himself. While initially antagonistic, he comes to respect Sakura and begins aiding her to capture the cards. Once Sakura captures all of the cards, she is tested by Yue the judge, the cards’ second guardian, to determine if she is worthy of becoming the cards’ true master; Yue is also the true form of Yukito Tsukishiro, Toya’s best friend. Aided by her teacher Kaho Mizuki, Sakura passes the test and becomes the new master of the Clow Cards.